Can I Superglue My Tooth Back On?

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Can I Superglue My Tooth Back On?

Midtown Dentistry
Houston, Texas

Can I superglue my tooth back on if it falls off?

No, it is not a good idea to superglue your tooth back on. The following are the reason you should not superglue a broken tooth:

1. Based upon the Superglue warning label, there are dire warnings about its effect on your skin.

2. You run the risk of swallowing some of the glue. Ingesting this glue is not beneficial to your health and in large amounts could be toxic.

3. Using Superglue to attach a broken tooth will only be a temporary measure. The tooth or crown will fall out again, and you will still need to see a dentist

There is a temporary solution if you are unable to see your dentist immediately.

Use Temporary Dental Cement Until You Can Get To Your Dentist

If you can’t see your dentist immediately, then visit your local drug store and purchase temporary dental cement. You can use it to fix your crown back in position temporarily.

This is not a long-term solution. It is vital to get proper professional dental care as there might have been some reason as to why your tooth fell off in the first place.

Lastly, you will not be able to re-cement the crown entirely accurately. This makes it possible that bacteria could enter the tooth, causing infection and decay.

Dental Crowns Do Not Last Forever

If the tooth was crowned quite a few years ago, then it is likely to have reached the end of its life and will need replacing. If the crown is relatively new, then it might be possible for your dentist to cement it back in position. If your crown is continually falling off, then it could be that there is not enough of the natural tooth left to hold it in place, and your dentist might need to build up the remaining tooth in some way to provide more support for a new crown.

The Consequences of Not Replacing Lost Crowns

Perhaps your crown is in a less visible part of your mouth? If so you might be tempted not to get it replaced or adequately re-cemented. This would be a big mistake and would increase the likelihood of that tooth becoming decayed and eventually needing root canal treatment or even extraction.

When a tooth is shaped for a crown, then the protective outer layer of dental enamel has to be ground away to create sufficient room for the crown.

Once dental enamel is removed, then the tooth will always need to be covered up to protect it from bacteria in the mouth.  Dental crowns are designed to form a tight seal around the margin of the tooth. If this seal is broken, or if the crown is removed, then bacteria will be able to attack the unprotected tooth.

 

Why take this risk? It is far better to have loose dental crowns correctly sorted out by your dentist than to have to deal with the consequences of losing a tooth.

 

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